bobbycaputo:

Charming Photos of Iconic Tech Relics, From Brick Phones to Zip Drives

When Jim Golden was a child growing up in the 1980s, he identified as a geek. He was enamored with the technology of his youth, and waxed poetic about using a rotary phone to dial up his modem. The renowned commercial photographer’s career has spanned more than 15 years, taking him from the fast-past advertising world of New York City to the more laid-back vibe of his studio in Portland, Oregon. Though his aesthetic has grown and shifted in that time, his appreciation of “direct and logical design”–namely, simplicity in form, influenced by typologies and categorization–pervades his work.

Golden shot on film in the early days of his career, and the storyline of the decline of analog photography parallels that of the technology of his youth. His latest project, Relics of Technology, is a visual catalog of the items people of a certain age remember well, the antecedents to the technology so many of us take for granted today. 

“When I look back on that tech, there’s a nostalgia element, a love for all those forms and textures and sounds and smells,” he says. “I wanted to elevate those items to art and remind people of all those overlooked objects.”

(Continue Reading)

The Naked House in Kawagoe, Japan, created in 2000 by this year’s Pritzker Architecture Prize winner Shigeru Ban. Four modular rooms on casters. Love it so, so much. Via The New York Times.

The Naked House in Kawagoe, Japan, created in 2000 by this year’s Pritzker Architecture Prize winner Shigeru Ban. Four modular rooms on casters. Love it so, so much. Via The New York Times.

shphotostudios:


Growth
So haunting.

art-library:


Ilya Repin, Portrait of writer Vsevolod Mikhailovich Garshin, 1884.
This portrait by Ilya Repin is of a very famous Russian writer, Vsevolod Mikhailovich Garshin. Garshin was the author of popular Russian short stories such as “A Red Flower”. The writer was psychologically troubled, which may have been due do the fact that both his father and brother committed suicide, and his illness can be seen in his writing. At a young age, Garshin himself committed suicide.
Before the portrait was completed, Garshin’s readers would often have discussions about what the young author looked like, and this portrait by Repin gave Russians an actual image of the writer. In the portrait, Garshin appears as if he has been interrupted while at work at his desk. His eyes appear sad and watery. The palette is muted, and Repin’s brushstrokes are loose and impressionistic, which may have been influenced by Repin’s love for the French impressionist Edgar Degas.
This was not the first time Garshin posed for Repin in a painting: Garshin posed as the son of Ivan the Terrible in the painting Ivan the Terrible and His son Ivan, heightening the significance of the portrait.

So haunting.

art-library:

Ilya Repin, Portrait of writer Vsevolod Mikhailovich Garshin, 1884.

This portrait by Ilya Repin is of a very famous Russian writer, Vsevolod Mikhailovich Garshin. Garshin was the author of popular Russian short stories such as “A Red Flower”. The writer was psychologically troubled, which may have been due do the fact that both his father and brother committed suicide, and his illness can be seen in his writing. At a young age, Garshin himself committed suicide.

Before the portrait was completed, Garshin’s readers would often have discussions about what the young author looked like, and this portrait by Repin gave Russians an actual image of the writer. In the portrait, Garshin appears as if he has been interrupted while at work at his desk. His eyes appear sad and watery. The palette is muted, and Repin’s brushstrokes are loose and impressionistic, which may have been influenced by Repin’s love for the French impressionist Edgar Degas.

This was not the first time Garshin posed for Repin in a painting: Garshin posed as the son of Ivan the Terrible in the painting Ivan the Terrible and His son Ivan, heightening the significance of the portrait.

lorrainecink:

theadventuresofmichaelpawlak:

Tonight’s posts celebrate the wonders of nature.

Nightmares forever.

(Source: earloffabulousness)

1799 caricature of gout by James Gillray.

1799 caricature of gout by James Gillray.

Beanie and her most terrifying doll. Via Iain McKell’s The New Gypsies. Here’s a thing.

Beanie and her most terrifying doll. Via Iain McKell’s The New Gypsies. Here’s a thing.

Now, see, I haven’t read any superhero comics since I finished with Watchmen. I hate superheroes. I think they’re abominations. They don’t mean what they used to mean. They were originally in the hands of writers who would actively expand the imagination of their nine- to 13-year-old audience. That was completely what they were meant to do and they were doing it excellently. These days, superhero comics think the audience is certainly not nine to 13, it’s nothing to do with them. It’s an audience largely of 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-year old men, usually men. Someone came up with the term graphic novel. These readers latched on to it; they were simply interested in a way that could validate their continued love of Green Lantern or Spider-Man without appearing in some way emotionally subnormal. This is a significant rump of the superhero-addicted, mainstream-addicted audience. I don’t think the superhero stands for anything good. I think it’s a rather alarming sign if we’ve got audiences of adults going to see the Avengers movie and delighting in concepts and characters meant to entertain the 12-year-old boys of the 1950s.
Alan Moore (via ohmygil, who writes Moore off as a hypocritical old loon, but also makes a few interesting counterpoints in subsequent posts)
The Creative Process:
1. This is awesome
2. This is tricky
3. This is shit
4. I am shit
5. This might be ok
6. This is awesome
RT @MarcusRomer
Pizza Kitten Galaxy via (ennghh) Cheezburger via Matt Russell via George Wietor.

Pizza Kitten Galaxy via (ennghh) Cheezburger via Matt Russell via George Wietor.